Today’s post highlights a research paper out of Italy published this past April. (1) The study compared fasting blood markers for the presence of zonulin, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and the inflammatory immune protein CD14 between healthy 100-year-olds and two other groups: those under the age of 40 who had the misfortune of having suffered a heart attack Read More →

Abbreviations: F-HFD: fructose enriched high-fat coconut oil diet F-SO-HFD: fructose enriched high-fat soybean oil diet HFD: high-fat coconut oil diet LPSs: lipopolysaccharides PUFAs: polyunsaturated fatty acids SO-HFD: high-fat soybean oil diet Viv: low-fat, high-fiber rodent diet   “Look! It’s moving. It’s sa — it’s… it’s alive. It’s alive… It’s alive, it’s moving, it’s alive! It’s Read More →

Coronary

  As long time readers of this blog know, I consider metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, etc.) as fundamentally caused by translocating gut bacteria to the liver and systemic circulation. This explains what initiates what I’ve termed “The Inflammatory-Cortisol Ballet” and the metabolic consequences that flow from that. When it comes to heart Read More →

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  Over the past year and a half, I’ve spent much my time on this blog detailing the various dietary practices and other conditions that can impair intestinal-barrier function, and for good reason. While our intestines are located within us, as far as the body is concerned, this environment is actually external to it. And Read More →

  “Saturated fats are benign with regard to inflammatory effects, as are the MUFAs [monounsaturated fats]. The meager effect that saturated fats have on serum cholesterol levels when modest but adequate amounts of polyunsaturated oils are included in the diet, and the lack of any clear evidence that saturated fats are promoting any of the Read More →

  It’s been known for quite a long time that shift workers are at an increased risk for developing a number of diseases. Observational studies have found a strong association between shift work and heart and cerebrovascular diseases. (1) Other studies have noted robust correlations between shift-work and the risk of obesity (2) (3), diabetes Read More →

Much has been written about the harmful consequences of runaway oxidation. As part of normal cellular respiration, there is no way to avoid some level of free radical production because for better or worse, oxygen is a very reactive substance yet necessary for life itself. Oxidation, however, is not merely the addition of oxygen atoms Read More →

  A few posts back, I expressed my skepticism about a recently published study conducted at the Cleveland Clinic and splashed across the media that purported to show how L-carnitine, found in abundance in red meat, causes heart disease by interacting with gut flora. You can read that post here if you missed it. Unfortunately Read More →

  I’m sure most of you have heard or read about a recent study linking red meat consumption to heart disease. Entitled, Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis (1), it purports to show a new mechanism explaining how consuming red meat increases cardiovascular risk. First, let me thank my Read More →

  On February 5th, the British Medical Journal published the subject of today’s post: Use of dietary linoleic acid for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and death: evaluation of recovered data from the Sydney Diet Heart Study and updated meta-analysis. (1) To those of you unfamiliar with the Sydney Diet Heart Study (SDHS), it Read More →

  In this fifth and final post on gut dysbiosis, endotoxemia and heart disease, I want to explore the role cholesterol plays in all of this. As you know, I consider cholesterol an innocent bystander in this piece, not the villain. So what is cholesterol? Cholesterol is an alcohol but not the same type of Read More →

    In this post, I discussed how unlikely it is that normal digestion of long-chain fatty acids is the source of the pathogens initiating arterial plaque formation. If anything, I showed how protective chylomicrons are in preventing just that. This then leaves us with increased intestinal permeability as the most likely source of translocating Read More →

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