Abbreviations: ASO mice: alpha synuclein over-expressing mice aSyn: alpha-synuclein BBB: Blood Brain Barrier IBD: Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBS: Irritable Bowel Syndrome MSA: multiple system atrophy, Shy–Drager syndrome PD: Parkinson’s Disease SCFAs: Short Chain Fatty Acids SIBO: Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth   According to the Merck Manual, Parkinson’s disease (PD) is defined as: “a slowly progressive, degenerative disorder Read More →

“Chronic low-grade inflammation is now considered to be a critical pathological factor underlying many modern chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, and is associated with aging. Chronic low-grade inflammation is characterized by elevated circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6. A primary cause Read More →

  “Saturated fats are benign with regard to inflammatory effects, as are the MUFAs [monounsaturated fats]. The meager effect that saturated fats have on serum cholesterol levels when modest but adequate amounts of polyunsaturated oils are included in the diet, and the lack of any clear evidence that saturated fats are promoting any of the Read More →

    This is quick post alerting my readers to some new research about Crohn’s disease (CD). CD is an inflammatory, autoimmune bowel disease that can affect any part of the digestive tract. However, it is most likely to manifest itself in the ileum of the small intestine or proximal colon. It primarily causes abdominal Read More →

  Spend anytime visiting nutrition-oriented blogs and you quickly discover that the topic of dairy consumption elicits strong opinions. Dairy, in all its forms, has been variously blamed for heart disease, cancer, autism, diabetes, obesity, Kim Kardashian’s fame…well pretty much everything. Some caution against the consumption of dairy by pointing to the fact that humans Read More →

  Today I want to continue my discussion of foods, drinks and drugs that tend to aggravate an infected and inflamed gastrointestinal mucosa. Fiber The last post covered gut bacteria’s well-known ability to produce intestinal gas by fermenting fiber. However, dietary fiber, especially insoluble fiber, has other damaging characteristics. As I’ve mentioned before, fiber swells Read More →

  Today I’m going to talk about some dietary changes that may offer some of you symptom relief from your gastrointestinal issues. This is not a cure for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. These disorders will require reducing gut pathogens and/or overgrowth of fungus like Candida Read More →

  Today I want to cover how gut pathogens can negatively impact the ability to digest food and regulate appetite. Here is an illustration of what should be, but oftentimes isn’t, absorbed in the digestive tract:   Your ability to absorb nutrition is reliant on a healthy small intestine. If any part of the small Read More →

  It should surprise none of you that I consider weight dysregulation one of the many manifestations of gut dysbiosis. Obesity is associated with a whole host of disorders, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Much of what I’ve written about endotoxemia also applies to obesity. This isn’t to say that Read More →

  In part one of this series, I covered what small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is. This post will concern itself with the diseases it’s associated with. As always, association is not causation so SIBO may be along for the ride and not the initiating cause, or conversely, it might be. It can often be Read More →

  What Are Prebiotics? Most people know what a probiotic is but what, exactly, is a prebiotic? Prebiotics are non-digestable but fermentable soluble fibers that stimulate the growth of beneficial gut flora in the colon. I like to think of prebiotics as fertilizer for your friendly colonic bacteria. There are two types of prebiotics. Shorter-chain Read More →

  In the previous two posts I wrote about the different types of gut flora and their physiological functions. In this post, I want to write about what can go terribly wrong when our commensal gut flora are unhappy. Let’s first define the term dysbiosis or disordered flora. I find that this term is thrown around Read More →