bigstock

  “Proton-pump inhibitor therapy is now being prescribed for a wide variety of upper gastrointestinal symptoms on the basis that they might be acid induced and therefore may benefit from such treatment. This increasingly liberal usage of these powerful drugs is due to a number of factors, including reduced concerns about potential side effects, reduced Read More →

bigstock

  “Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.” Thomas Jefferson     Abbreviations: BCM7: beta-casomorphin-7 C. albicans: Candida albicans FOS: fructooligosaccharide GERD: gastroesophageal reflux disease GI: gastrointestinal H. pylori: Helicobacter pylori, aka Campylobacter pylori IBS: irritable bowel syndrome LES: Read More →

  “Saturated fats are benign with regard to inflammatory effects, as are the MUFAs [monounsaturated fats]. The meager effect that saturated fats have on serum cholesterol levels when modest but adequate amounts of polyunsaturated oils are included in the diet, and the lack of any clear evidence that saturated fats are promoting any of the Read More →

  The role of stress in negatively impacting the gastrointestinal system has long been recognized. It doesn’t take an Einstein to note a strong correlation between acute psychological stress and the onset of gut feelings that are anything but pleasant. I’ve written about how gut dysbiosis is capable of initiating psychological states like depression and Read More →

  It’s been known for quite a long time that shift workers are at an increased risk for developing a number of diseases. Observational studies have found a strong association between shift work and heart and cerebrovascular diseases. (1) Other studies have noted robust correlations between shift-work and the risk of obesity (2) (3), diabetes Read More →

  Today’s post will cover some of the research concerning the connection between gut dysbiosis and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASDs are a group of developmental disabilities that cause a whole host of challenges in afflicted children. Among these are difficulties with social interaction, communication, behavior and movement. Males are approximately four times more likely Read More →

  Today I woke up to a comment from a long-time reader by the name of Sam, and thought my reply would be better served by a short post. Here is Sam’s comment: “Ray, Recently Chris Kresser did a podcast with a question about probiotics. The link is: http://chriskresser.com/solutions-for-snoring-overactive-bladder-and-balancing-goitrogens-in-your-diet Here is an excerpt: ** Most Read More →

Much has been written about the harmful consequences of runaway oxidation. As part of normal cellular respiration, there is no way to avoid some level of free radical production because for better or worse, oxygen is a very reactive substance yet necessary for life itself. Oxidation, however, is not merely the addition of oxygen atoms Read More →

  Today I want to write about the mucus layer that lines the gut wall. This often overlooked part of the gastrointestinal tract is of immense importance in preventing metabolic endotoxemia. Mucins are the primary component of the mucus layer that lines the digestive tract. Mucins are high-molecular weight glycoproteins. Glycoproteins are proteins that contain Read More →

  Today’s post will cover a recent paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (1) The research group responsible for this paper has been at the forefront in investigating how metabolic endotoxemia impacts numerous health outcomes, including weight regulation and glucose control. This study sought to determine whether a particular Read More →