Abbreviations: ATIs: amylase and trypsin enzyme inhibitors HFD: high-fat diet HPA axis: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis IAP: intestinal alkaline phosphatase (aka alkaline phosphatase) IL1-β: interleukin 1 beta LPSs: lipopolysaccharides NF-kB: nuclear factor kappa B PUFAs: polyunsaturated fatty acids TLRs: toll-like receptors TLR4: toll-like receptor 4 TNF-α: tumor necrosis factor alpha WGA: wheat germ agglutinin Today I Read More →

Glass

  Abbreviations: CNS: central nervous system DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid DNMTs: DNA methyltranferases EAAT: excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3: excitatory amino acid transporter 3 ENS: enteric nervous system FODMAP: Fermentable Oligo-, Di- and Mono-saccharides and Polyols GERD: gastroesophageal reflux disease GSH: glutathione IBS: irritable bowel syndrome LPSs: lipopolysaccharides SAM: S-adenosylmethionine SIFBO: small intestinal fungal and bacterial Read More →

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  “Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.” Thomas Jefferson     Abbreviations: BCM7: beta-casomorphin-7 C. albicans: Candida albicans FOS: fructooligosaccharide GERD: gastroesophageal reflux disease GI: gastrointestinal H. pylori: Helicobacter pylori, aka Campylobacter pylori IBS: irritable bowel syndrome LES: Read More →

  Today’s post will cover some of the research concerning the connection between gut dysbiosis and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASDs are a group of developmental disabilities that cause a whole host of challenges in afflicted children. Among these are difficulties with social interaction, communication, behavior and movement. Males are approximately four times more likely Read More →

Not Just For Vampires! Those who read my small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) series know that I credit garlic, along with probiotics and prebiotics, for helping me cure myself of it. I described my experience in the last post of that series. I’ve since received many emails from people about their experiences using this herb. Read More →

  Today I’m going to talk about some dietary changes that may offer some of you symptom relief from your gastrointestinal issues. This is not a cure for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. These disorders will require reducing gut pathogens and/or overgrowth of fungus like Candida Read More →

  “Although genetic and biological factors play a major role in the development of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and diabetes, these common disorders that are part of the metabolic syndrome are probably influenced by other factors. Evidence suggests that these disorders are mediated by a complex interplay between genetics, biology, and the environment. Stress, whether Read More →

  Today I want to cover how gut pathogens can negatively impact the ability to digest food and regulate appetite. Here is an illustration of what should be, but oftentimes isn’t, absorbed in the digestive tract:   Your ability to absorb nutrition is reliant on a healthy small intestine. If any part of the small Read More →

  It should surprise none of you that I consider weight dysregulation one of the many manifestations of gut dysbiosis. Obesity is associated with a whole host of disorders, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Much of what I’ve written about endotoxemia also applies to obesity. This isn’t to say that Read More →

  As promised, I want to discuss what role, if any, dietary fat plays in metabolic endotoxemia, especially in relation to cardiovascular disease. It appears from both animal and human studies that fat indeed increases the translocation of inflammatory lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from the gut into systemic circulation. What needs to be determined is whether all Read More →

  In the last post, I promised to blog on the role dietary fat and cholesterol play in endotoxemia and heart disease. However, before I do, I feel a need to clarify exactly what part of the digestive tract these toxins are most likely coming from. Where these endotoxins cross the gut wall helps give Read More →

  “We calculate that 99.99% (by weight) of the pesticides in the American diet are chemicals that plants produce to defend themselves….We estimate that Americans eat about 1.5g of natural pesticides per person per day, which is about 10,000 times more than they eat of synthetic pesticide residues.” From the paper Dietary pesticides (99.99% all Read More →

  Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is exactly what it sounds like, an overgrowth of pathogenic or harmful bacteria in the small intestine, and I think a lot of people are walking around with this medical condition but have no idea they have it. Partly because most people have never heard of it and partly Read More →