“Chronic low-grade inflammation is now considered to be a critical pathological factor underlying many modern chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, and is associated with aging. Chronic low-grade inflammation is characterized by elevated circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6. A primary cause Read More →

Abbreviations: F-HFD: fructose enriched high-fat coconut oil diet F-SO-HFD: fructose enriched high-fat soybean oil diet HFD: high-fat coconut oil diet LPSs: lipopolysaccharides PUFAs: polyunsaturated fatty acids SO-HFD: high-fat soybean oil diet Viv: low-fat, high-fiber rodent diet   “Look! It’s moving. It’s sa — it’s… it’s alive. It’s alive… It’s alive, it’s moving, it’s alive! It’s Read More →

  Abbreviations: ATIs: amylase and trypsin enzyme inhibitors HFD: high-fat diet HPA axis: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis IAP: intestinal alkaline phosphatase (aka alkaline phosphatase) IL1-β: interleukin 1 beta LPSs: lipopolysaccharides NF-kB: nuclear factor kappa B PUFAs: polyunsaturated fatty acids TLRs: toll-like receptors TLR4: toll-like receptor 4 TNF-α: tumor necrosis factor alpha WGA: wheat germ agglutinin Today I Read More →

Coronary

  As long time readers of this blog know, I consider metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, etc.) as fundamentally caused by translocating gut bacteria to the liver and systemic circulation. This explains what initiates what I’ve termed “The Inflammatory-Cortisol Ballet” and the metabolic consequences that flow from that. When it comes to heart Read More →

Colon Anatomy

  This is a short post about an intriguing study done in rodents to assess what effect different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have on progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). (1) Ulcerative colitis is defined by Taber’s medical dictionary as: “An inflammatory bowel disease marked pathologically by continuous inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, which typically involves Read More →

  “Saturated fats are benign with regard to inflammatory effects, as are the MUFAs [monounsaturated fats]. The meager effect that saturated fats have on serum cholesterol levels when modest but adequate amounts of polyunsaturated oils are included in the diet, and the lack of any clear evidence that saturated fats are promoting any of the Read More →

  The role of stress in negatively impacting the gastrointestinal system has long been recognized. It doesn’t take an Einstein to note a strong correlation between acute psychological stress and the onset of gut feelings that are anything but pleasant. I’ve written about how gut dysbiosis is capable of initiating psychological states like depression and Read More →

  On February 5th, the British Medical Journal published the subject of today’s post: Use of dietary linoleic acid for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and death: evaluation of recovered data from the Sydney Diet Heart Study and updated meta-analysis. (1) To those of you unfamiliar with the Sydney Diet Heart Study (SDHS), it Read More →

  Today I want to continue my discussion of foods, drinks and drugs that tend to aggravate an infected and inflamed gastrointestinal mucosa. Fiber The last post covered gut bacteria’s well-known ability to produce intestinal gas by fermenting fiber. However, dietary fiber, especially insoluble fiber, has other damaging characteristics. As I’ve mentioned before, fiber swells Read More →

  I want to continue my series on weight dysregulation by examining the role endotoxemia may play.  As you may have noticed, nowhere in the title does the word obesity appear. While I will talk about how gram-negative pathogens can promote weight gain, it’s equally clear that lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) derived from these same organisms can Read More →

  Today I want to cover how gut pathogens can negatively impact the ability to digest food and regulate appetite. Here is an illustration of what should be, but oftentimes isn’t, absorbed in the digestive tract:   Your ability to absorb nutrition is reliant on a healthy small intestine. If any part of the small Read More →

  In this fifth and final post on gut dysbiosis, endotoxemia and heart disease, I want to explore the role cholesterol plays in all of this. As you know, I consider cholesterol an innocent bystander in this piece, not the villain. So what is cholesterol? Cholesterol is an alcohol but not the same type of Read More →

Post Navigation