Today I woke up to a comment from a long-time reader by the name of Sam, and thought my reply would be better served by a short post. Here is Sam’s comment: “Ray, Recently Chris Kresser did a podcast with a question about probiotics. The link is: http://chriskresser.com/solutions-for-snoring-overactive-bladder-and-balancing-goitrogens-in-your-diet Here is an excerpt: ** Most Read More →

Much has been written about the harmful consequences of runaway oxidation. As part of normal cellular respiration, there is no way to avoid some level of free radical production because for better or worse, oxygen is a very reactive substance yet necessary for life itself. Oxidation, however, is not merely the addition of oxygen atoms Read More →

  “Professor Colin Pritchard’s latest research published in Public Health journal has found that the sharp rise of dementia and other neurological deaths in people under 74 cannot be put down to the fact that we are living longer – the rise is because a higher proportion of old people are being affected by such Read More →

  I’m sure most of you have heard or read about a recent study linking red meat consumption to heart disease. Entitled, Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis (1), it purports to show a new mechanism explaining how consuming red meat increases cardiovascular risk. First, let me thank my Read More →

  Today’s post reviews an interesting rodent study conducted in South Korea and recently published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. (1) This trial sought to determine whether probiotic supplementation, in this case Lactobacillus curvatus along with Lactobacillus plantarum, would lessen the ill effects of high-fructose feeding. By the way, both bacterial strains were derived Read More →

Today’s post summarizes an intriguing study on the role Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) may play in inhibiting breast cancer development. (1) I need to emphasize the word “may” as this study was done with rodents and not people. Like any hypothesis pertaining to health, we won’t know if this has applicability until subjected to clinical Read More →

Not Just For Vampires! Those who read my small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) series know that I credit garlic, along with probiotics and prebiotics, for helping me cure myself of it. I described my experience in the last post of that series. I’ve since received many emails from people about their experiences using this herb. Read More →

  High blood pressure or hypertension afflicts one in four adults in the developed world. Hypertension is diagnosed when sustained blood pressure reaches or exceeds 140 mm HG systolic pressure (maximum arterial pressure) over 90 mm Hg diastolic pressure (minimum arterial pressure). Hypertension is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke and should Read More →

  What would happen if you fed prebiotics to genetically obese mice or mice fed an obesity-inducing high-fat diet? Would anything change? That’s the subject of today’s post, which covers such an experiment published in 2011. (1) Two different types of mice were used in this study. The ob/ob C57BL/6 mouse and the C57BL/6J mouse. Read More →

  Continuing with my coverage of regulatory tight-junction proteins and gut-barrier function, today I want to examine the role of a particular member of our beneficial gut flora community. A 2008 study examined which of the following gut bacteria contributed the most to gut-barrier function (1): Bifidobacterium breve Bifidobacterium infantis Bifidobacterium longum Lactobacillus acidophilus Lactobacillus delbrueckii Read More →

  Continuing from my post on probiotics and respiratory viruses, I want to review some trials that studied how probiotics can augment the effects of a flu shot. When the seasonal flu vaccine closely matches circulating influenza viruses, effectiveness against catching the flu ranges between 70-90% in healthy adults. Unfortunately, unlike wine, these statistics do Read More →