Today I woke up to a comment from a long-time reader by the name of Sam, and thought my reply would be better served by a short post. Here is Sam’s comment: “Ray, Recently Chris Kresser did a podcast with a question about probiotics. The link is: http://chriskresser.com/solutions-for-snoring-overactive-bladder-and-balancing-goitrogens-in-your-diet Here is an excerpt: ** Most Read More →

  Today I want to write about the mucus layer that lines the gut wall. This often overlooked part of the gastrointestinal tract is of immense importance in preventing metabolic endotoxemia. Mucins are the primary component of the mucus layer that lines the digestive tract. Mucins are high-molecular weight glycoproteins. Glycoproteins are proteins that contain Read More →

  I consider bacterial translocation from the gut, aka, metabolic endotoxemia, the key to understanding chronic conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Gut pathogens and large food molecules that breach the gut wall provoke inflammatory immune responses that negatively impact the liver and other organs throughout the body, including the brain. For those of you Read More →

Not Just For Vampires! Those who read my small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) series know that I credit garlic, along with probiotics and prebiotics, for helping me cure myself of it. I described my experience in the last post of that series. I’ve since received many emails from people about their experiences using this herb. Read More →

  Fibromyalgia is a disease characterized by chronic wide-spread pain. These painful areas are spread throughout numerous points on the body. Other symptoms of this disorder are joint stiffness, gastrointestinal upset and mental distress: insomnia, fatigue, depression, anxiety and cognitive dysfunction. Estimates for the prevalence of fibromyalgia range from between 1% to 2% of the Read More →

  Today I want to briefly review two research papers examining the role of increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut) and visceral fat accumulation. Visceral fat, otherwise known as central obesity, is a recognized risk factor for the development of fatty liver, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This type of fat is packed in and Read More →

  In this post, I want to write about an interesting Brazilian study that examined the effects of feeding gluten in combination with a high-fat diet to C57BL/6 mice, the most popular strain of mice used in laboratories around the world. (1) Would our furry friends experience any negative effects from consuming the protein found Read More →

  Today I want to continue my discussion of foods, drinks and drugs that tend to aggravate an infected and inflamed gastrointestinal mucosa. Fiber The last post covered gut bacteria’s well-known ability to produce intestinal gas by fermenting fiber. However, dietary fiber, especially insoluble fiber, has other damaging characteristics. As I’ve mentioned before, fiber swells Read More →

  Today I’m going to talk about some dietary changes that may offer some of you symptom relief from your gastrointestinal issues. This is not a cure for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. These disorders will require reducing gut pathogens and/or overgrowth of fungus like Candida Read More →

  “Although genetic and biological factors play a major role in the development of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and diabetes, these common disorders that are part of the metabolic syndrome are probably influenced by other factors. Evidence suggests that these disorders are mediated by a complex interplay between genetics, biology, and the environment. Stress, whether Read More →

  I want to continue my series on weight dysregulation by examining the role endotoxemia may play.  As you may have noticed, nowhere in the title does the word obesity appear. While I will talk about how gram-negative pathogens can promote weight gain, it’s equally clear that lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) derived from these same organisms can Read More →

  It should surprise none of you that I consider weight dysregulation one of the many manifestations of gut dysbiosis. Obesity is associated with a whole host of disorders, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Much of what I’ve written about endotoxemia also applies to obesity. This isn’t to say that Read More →